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Do You Know Your Target Audience? How to Do Stakeholder Analysis [video]

An effective communication strategy includes all 5M components: Mission/Measurement, Members, Messages, Media, and Manager/Champion Support. (We will be providing an overview of all 5M components in episode 003 of the Engaging Leader Podcast yet this week.)

Stakeholder Analysis is very helpful with the second “M.” It is a simple exercise that you can complete as an individual or group to identify which audience members have a stake in your communication/leadership issue. If you don’t identify all the stakeholders, you could miss important groups of people who could impact (positively or negatively) whether you achieve your objectives.

Once you identify the stakeholders, you may want to choose some of the key stakeholders to perform another simple exercise, the .

” href=”https://www.engagingleader.com/how-to-use-an-empathy-map-to-understand-your-audience-video/”>Empathy Map.

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Engaging Leader™

002: 6 Sure-Fire Paths to Employee Engagement

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In this episode, Jesse explains what it means to engage employees and why it is important for leaders to engage the people around them.

He outlines the 6 Cs of Engagement and shares personal stories of applying these principles in the workplace:

  • Context (Why)
  • Clarity (Vision)
  • Credibility (Trustworthiness)
  • Caring (Well-Being)
  • Connecting (Relationship)
  • Coaching (Personal/Career Development)

Resources Mentioned in This Episode

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If you like our show, please rate us on iTunes. That makes a huge difference in helping more people discover it. We love to know your thoughts about this episode. Please submit your comments below! You can also email comments to Jesse at [email protected], subscribe to him on Facebook, or follow him on Twitter.

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Video

6 Ways to Engage Employees, Customers, and Followers [video]

Whether engaging employees, followers, customers, or your children, you need to be effective at all 6 Cs of engagement. There are other factors that impact engagement, but all six of these are levers that you as a leader can pull.

“There are only three measurements that tell you nearly everything you need to know about your organization’s overall performance: employee engagement, customer satisfaction, and cash flow…. It goes without saying that no company, small or large, can win over the long run without energized employees who believe in the mission and understand how to achieve it.” – Jack Welch (Business Week, May 2006)

 

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6 Keys to Engage Employees (Are You Missing Any?)

Whether you are engaging employees, followers, customers, or even your children, you need to be effective at all 6Cs of engagement.

One of the best bosses I ever had was a guy who was pretty good at five of the six Cs. In fact, the one C where he was lacking is the one that most people would guess to be the least important. There are other factors besides a manager’s leadership that affect employee engagement, yet there’s a chance I would still be on his team today if my boss hadn’t neglected one of the Cs.

Often experts write books or make speeches that emphasize one area over another, but I think all six are fairly equal in importance.

  • Context (Why): What is our team’s purpose? Why is the company making this change? Why do I need to do this task? Leaders must communicate the context early and often.
  • Clarity (Vision): Where are we going? What future are we creating together? Is our future as a team? Again, leaders must proactively communicate the vision often, or else clarity doesn’t occur or doesn’t last.
  • Credibility (Trustworthiness): Why should I trust you as a leader? Do you know what you’re talking about? Are you honest and authentic? Do you practice what you preach? Leaders must be sure that their words, bearing, and especially their actions communicate credibility.
  • Caring (Well-Being): Do you care about me as a person? Is my job satisfaction or workplace happiness a priority for you?
  • Connecting (Relationship): Do you and I have anything in common? Do you take the time to interact with me in ways that stimulate me emotionally, socially, recreationally, or intellectually? If we spent a weekend together, would we both enjoy it?
  • Coaching (Career Development): Are you fully supporting me? Are you helping me advance toward my goals? Are you helping me learn, grow, and achieve my full potential?

Notice that the first two Cs may be organizational. Context and Clarity may be dictated by the company CEO, for example, but they still need to be translated for each department and each individual’s role.

Credibility is totally personal – it’s all about both the competence and the integrity of the leader.

The last three Cs are relational. Caring, Connecting, and Coaching are all about the space between the leader and the individual.

By the way, the one C that my boss was most lacking was Coaching. There was no question that he fully supported me. But he didn’t take time to understand my long-term goals and needs, and help me develop in the areas that would have made a difference toward those goals. For example, my team and I were quite successful from a financial perspective, but I could have been a much better leader with some leadership training. Also, I had mastered certain competencies and was becoming bored and burnt out with nothing new to challenge me intellectually, and a good executive coach could have helped me develop new competencies to keep me excited.

When you take the time to know your team members, you can use the 6Cs to better meet their needs.

For an in-depth explanation of the 6 Cs of Engagement, listen to the Engaging Leader podcast episode 002.

For a visual discussion of the 6 Cs of Engagement, watch Jesse’s video tutorial.

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Engaging Leader™

001: 7 Habits of Highly Engaging Leaders

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In this episode, Jesse discusses Stephen Covey’s famous Seven Habits of Highly Effective People and the importance of putting these habits into practice in order to become an effective leader.

Jesse shares stories that illustrate how to apply business principles based on the seven habits to engage employees and increase your effectiveness as a leader:

  • Be Proactive
  • Begin with the End in Mind
  • Put First Things First
  • Think Win-Win
  • Seek First to Understand, Then to be Understood
  • Synergize
  • Sharpen the Saw

 

Resources Mentioned in This Episode

Seven Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen Covey

Blog:  7 Habits That Engage People

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Your Feedback

If you like our show, please rate us on iTunes. That makes a huge difference in helping more people discover it. We love to know your thoughts about this episode. Please submit your comments below! You can also email comments to Jesse at [email protected], subscribe to him on Facebook, or follow him on Twitter.

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Video

Do You Understand Your Target Audience? How to Use an Empathy Map [video]

One of the great leadership teachers of our time passed away on July 16, 2012. Dr. Stephen Covey was the author of several books, most notably the highly influential book The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People. He wrote it way back in 1989, and yet it is still front and center in many bookstores today. In 2011, Time magazine named it one of the 25 Most Influential Business Management books of all time.

From Stephen Covey’s The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, Habit #5 is “Seek first to understand, then to be understood.”

Here is how I apply this to leadership communication: Get to know your audience … the various types of stakeholders you are hoping to influence. Spend time listening to their perspective, or at the very least, mentally imagining yourself in their place.

A great first step to understanding your audience is the Empathy Map, which is a fun exercise that takes only 15-20 minutes. In this video, I show an example of how to use the Empathy Map.

Other resources you may want to check out are:

For the transcript of this video: How to Use an Empathy Map (video transcript)

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Blog

7 Habits That Engage People

One of the great leadership teachers of our time passed away on July 16, 2012. Dr. Stephen Covey was the author of several books, most notably the highly influential book The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People. He wrote it way back in 1989, and yet it is still front and center in many bookstores today. In 2011, Time magazine named it one of the 25 Most Influential Business Management books of all time.

When I first read the book in 1996, early in my career as a communication consultant, I had been learning the skills and competencies of corporate communication and leadership. Covey’s book, however, taught principles that were fundamental to good communication and leadership in all aspects of business and life.

I recall excitedly telling a friend about the book. He rolled his eyes and said, “Is this another of those ‘dress for success’ books?” I did my best to explain that, instead, it was a “live for success” book.

Even in today’s world, which is quite different than when Covey published the book in 1989, it would be difficult to ignore any of the seven habits and still be an effective leader. Here is how leaders can apply the seven habits to engage people.

Leadership HabitCommunication Application
1Be proactive.Plan ahead and act quickly to take best advantage of communication opportunities, instead of waiting to react to communication problems.
2Begin with the end in mind.Start communication planning by crystallizing the outcomes you want the communication to achieve.
3Put first things first.Focus your communication agenda and core messages on no more than 3-5 priorities (or get laser-focused on only 1-3, which is even more powerful).
4Think win-win.After you identify your communication outcomes (your “win”), plan to address the question that every audience asks: “What’s in it for me?”
5Seek first to understand, then to be understood.Get to know your audience: the various types of stakeholders you are hoping to influence. Spend time listening to their perspective, or at the very least, mentally imagining yourself in their place.
6Synergize.Think about ways to involve some of your audience in some of the key decisions or other aspects of whatever you are communicating. Involvement is not only one of the best ways to engage their genuine support; it will probably create a superior outcome due to their input.
7Sharpen the saw.Treat communication as a key leadership competency. Invest time and resources in continuously improving your communication skills and capabilities.

Resources

For more on this topic, including stories that illustrate each of the communication habits, listen to our podcast episode 001: The 7 Habits of Highly Engaging Leaders.

You can buy The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People on Amazon.com here.

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Blog

Fueling Their 5-Stroke Engine: How to Win Lovers and Influence Co-workers

How to Win Lovers and Influence Co-WorkersCars have a four-stroke (or “four-cylinder”) engine, and lawn mowers have a two-stroke engine. But did you know that people have a five-stroke engine?

“It doesn’t feel like you love me when you hardly even appreciate me,” my wife told me. “I do some pretty amazing things, but to you they’re only worth a mildly enthusiastic acknowledgement.”

Huh? Just a few weeks earlier, on a whim I bought Erin a very thoughtful book that I knew she’d enjoy (and she did). Then on Valentine’s Day, I bought her Godiva chocolates (doesn’t that spell “love” to every woman?). And a short while later, I brought her flowers. How could she not feel loved?

The problem was that I was focusing on only one of the five strokes (Gifts), and it happened to be the stroke that is the least meaningful for Erin.

After many years of marriage counseling, Dr. Gary Chapman noticed a pattern: everyone he had ever counseled had what he calls a “love language,” a primary way of expressing and interpreting love. In The 5 Love Languages (which has sold five million copies), Dr. Chapman says that of the countless ways we can show love (or approval), five categories proved to be universal — everyone has a love language, and we all identify primarily with one of the five love languages.

I like to think in terms of a five-stroke engine that needs to be fueled, because it’s not just about love. Psychologist Kevin Leman says the five also apply to approval and respect — how you communicate approval and respect to others, and how you interpret how others are treating you.

To understand and remember all five strokes, I refer to the “cliff notes” versions rather than an entire book — there is a concise and enjoyable chapter on this topic in Dr. Leman’s book Have a New You by Friday, or a similar chapter in Andy Andrews’ book The Noticer. Both authors make them easier to remember because they associate each with a pet animal:

  1. Words of affirmation or approval (Dog). A dog loves to be praised. My wife is not a dog (she’s a fox!), but words are one of the biggest strokes for her. Erin gets revved up when I recognize specific examples of her talents, smarts, and personal charms. She doesn’t “feel the love” unless I talk about her unique qualities and achievements (and it doesn’t work to compliment her in vague ways like, “You are beautiful and smart”).
  2. Quality time (Canary). Unlike certain other pet birds, canaries require plenty of attention; otherwise they become lonely and sad. Many kids (especially teenagers) feel your approval most when you spend time with them and pay them attention. Simple acts such as laying with them at bed-time or watching their sports activities go a long way.
  3. Gifts (Chicken). Chickens get excited when you bring them a special gift of food, such as leftover veggies or fruit. My sister-in-law never forgets to give thoughtful gifts at all the right moments, which is a clue that gifts are probably an important stroke for her happiness.
  4. Acts of service (Goldfish). Goldfish seem perfectly happy as long as you feed them and keep their bowl clean. Leman tells a story of a guy whose wife is a “Martha Stewart” type. She is super-thoughtful for her husband — keeping his closet perfectly organized, making elaborate meals, and even picking out birthday cards for him to send his friends and colleagues. That’s a clue that she also feels most revved up when her husband does things to help her.
  5. Physical touch (Cat). A cat likes nothing better than being pet. Babies and children desperately need frequent physical contact. My wife, too, needs non-sexual touches from me as reassurance that I care about her, even when I’m not “turned on.” Remember that “Martha Stewart” lady? Leman says that despite her acts of service, her husband felt absolutely unloved. Like 90% of husbands, Leman says, he needed his wife’s physical assurance (in both sexual and non-sexual ways) that he was attractive and important to her.

Understanding the stroke that is most meaningful to the people you care about is not a secret formula to their heart (my wife is, after all, a complex creature — and anyway, she would rather feel pursued than have a formula applied to her). But it can help avoid frustration and misunderstanding, because you can show that you care in ways that are meaningful to them; and you can help them understand which stroke shows you they care for you, too.

Understanding these five strokes can also help you connect better with your kids and meet their need for love and approval. And it can even help you influence and inspire — or at least get along with — your co-workers. “Empathy is an important first step in trying to understand those around us,” said author Craig Morgan, “a step that will help us communicate and interact in a more productive and rewarding manner with the people in our lives.”

Think of one or two of the most significant people in your life. How can you best rev up their 5-stroke engine?

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Blog

9 Telltale Signs of an Engaging Leader

Business Concept. Leadership Sign.In How to Think Like an Engaging Leader, I explained the three most common motivations: Achievement (concerned with completing tasks), Affiliation (concerned with being liked), and Impact (concerned with influencing people). I also shared how if you are driven primarily by the Impact motive, you are more likely to be a successful leader.

However, you are even more likely to be successful if you advance beyond the first three stages of leadership. Ever had a lousy boss? A cold, domineering parent? Those people are interested in controlling other people, but that doesn’t make them a great leader.

The Burnham Rosen research team, who identified the importance of the Impact motive in leadership, also identified that the most successful leaders have progressed through four stages of leadership.

  1. Dependent (like a child): focused on getting what’s needed from others in authority. The power comes from other people, and that power affects the self. “I’ll ask the boss about your request.”
  2. Independent (like a teenager): focused on being competent and self-reliant. The power comes from the self, and that power affects the self. “I’m my own boss.”
  3. Imperial (like a benevolent dictator): focused on having an impact and making things happen through other people. The power comes from the self, and that power affects other people. “I influence you.”
  4. Interactive (like a sports team’s captain): focused on outcomes that make a difference for and with others. The power comes from other people, and that power affects other people. “We influence each other.”

Interestingly, the research shows that back in the 1970s, the majority of successful leaders at Fortune 500 companies were high in Imperial leadership. Their companies used a top-down, command-and-control approach that consistently produced better business results and employee morale. A great leader was charismatic, visionary, and excellent at making decisions.

Fast-forward a few decades, however, and the research reveals a drastic change. Today’s workforce is more diverse, with more women and more ethnicities represented. New technologies make information accessible to everyone. And globalization means greater competition and opportunities. As a result, the leaders who are producing the best business results are now those high in Interactive leadership.

Today, a great leader …

  • Is empathetic, authentic, self-disclosing
  • Is agile and flexible
  • Is collaborative, including co-creating a shared purpose with the team (rather than casting a vision for the team)
  • Sees and tolerates ambiguity and paradox
  • Encourages group accountability
  • Shares decision-making with others
  • Stimulates questioning and dialogue
  • Takes great pride in work outcomes (rather than in gaining and keeping power)
  • Regards long-term planning as a critical activity.

This new reality doesn’t just apply to Corporate America. Smaller organizations, self-employed people, and those who dream of owning their own business should pay attention too. To be in business is to be a leader. No matter how large or small your business, you have potential “followers” … whether they may be employees, suppliers, subcontractors, or even customers.

When I launched Aspendale Communications in 2004, I recognized (sort of) that even though I wanted to be self-employed (with no employees), I needed a team. A flexible team of sub-contractors allowed us to meet client needs without getting stressed out about the feast-or-famine nature of business that tends to sink freelancers eventually. In other words, unlike most people who launch a professional-services firm, I didn’t start at the Independent (Level 2) stage of leadership. Instead, I was practicing mostly Imperial (Level 3) leadership, and this proved relatively successful for several years.

Ultimately, however, this approach limited what we could accomplish as a team, and it stifled the personal development of our team members. For me, being an Imperial leader resulted in working too much on tasks outside of my passions, in long periods of overwork, and even in occasional burnout.

Changing the way I think, and looking for opportunities to practice Interactive leadership, has slowly but surely allowed our team to achieve greater business success and greater success as individuals. And it’s allowed me to accomplish more, while having a more balanced life.

Note: Burnham Rosen offers a three-day workshop for individuals and companies, to leverage this information to become a superior leader. I completed this workshop in November 2010 and highly recommend it. For a detailed description of the Burnham Rosen Group’s workshop go to www.burnhamrosen.com/IL.html or contact [email protected] for more information.

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Blog

How to Think Like an Engaging Leader

In studying hundreds of thousands of people from countries around the world, researchers at Burnham Rosen Group discovered that of the 300 positive motives that influence people’s behavior, 80% of all people are driven by some combination of just three motives. And more than 9 out of 10 white-collar professionals are internally motivated by the same three.

Thought patterns of a great leader.For most of us, one or more of these three motivations influence your thoughts and actions:

  • Achievement: Interested in excellence, completing tasks, efficiency, beating competition, beating past personal records, being unique, and career advancement.
  • Affiliation: Interested in friendship, close personal relationships, being liked and accepted, and avoiding being disliked by anyone.
  • Impact (also known as Power): Interested in influence, influential relationships, and making a difference in people’s lives.

The combination of these motives that influences your own thought patterns has a direct and definite impact on your success in life and career. For example, if Achievement dominates your thought patterns, you stand a good chance of success in roles such as a salesperson or entrepreneur. If Affiliation, you might be successful in a helping role, such as a social worker, teacher, or clinical psychologist. And if Impact, you could be successful in roles such as a business leader, politician, author, artist, thought leader, or architect (and also any sales position where consultative sales and long-term relationships are more important than quota-driven, one-time sales).

These thought patterns are programmed in you during childhood, teenage years, and early adulthood. But you can learn to adopt thought patterns that can bring you more success. To become an engaging leader at work, in your family, or in your community, the Impact motive is a key thought pattern to develop.

Note: Burnham Rosen offers a three-day workshop to leverage this information to become a superior leader. The core concept is that to create lasting, meaningful change, you must change the way you think. I completed this workshop in November 2010 and highly recommend it. For a detailed description of the Burnham Rosen Group’s workshop go to www.burnhamrosen.com/IL.html or contact [email protected] for more information.

Which do you think you are most motivated by: Achievement, Affiliation, or Impact?

For more about using these three needs to be a better leader, you may be interested in: