019: How to Help Your Team Have More Great Days at Work | with Chris Rice

by Joe Sherwood on January 10, 2013

How to Help Your Team Have More Great Days at Work

©2012 BlessingWhite, Inc.

In this episode Jesse is joined again by BlessingWhite CEO Christopher Rice for the second part of their two-part interview on employee engagement.  This time Chris and Jesse focus on how as a leader you can inspire your team to be more engaged and have more great days at work.

Chris shares his C.A.R.E. method for managers to fully engage employees in the workplace as well as how to avoid the engagement survey analysis-paralysis trap.  He also explains the C.A.S.E. executives need to build in order to cultivate employee engagement.

Resources Mentioned in This Episode

Podcast: How to Have More Great Days at Work

Additional resources and information about Chris’s book The Engagement Equation can be found at www.TheEngagementEquation.com

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  • This ties into something I am summing up right now about spreading joy with others.
    We should build ourselves up and then overflow and encourage others.
    Thank you again Jesse and Christopher.

    • Christopher, I agree! It’s great to keep ourselves charged up, but if we can help others get energized, I think we’ve made the world a better place. If more people were both highly satisfied and highly effective (in a sustainable way) in their work, we’d have a lot fewer problems in society.

  • Listened to this episode earlier today on my run. The conversation around organizations and surveys was a great one. I’m still surprised how often senior managers in organizations send mixed messages to people by saying something like “scores don’t matter” and then taking actions that completely contradict that message.

    Sadly, the entire process can do more harm than good. The organization still has whatever engagement issues it had, but now also has given people more reason not to trust senior managers. Speaks to the importance of having a partner like Christopher Rice in the process.

    Really appreciate the perspective you both brought on this…and goes right to the first rule of any kind of intervention like this: “Do no harm.”

    • Yes, it is surprising how often leaders underestimate the importance of consistency, both regarding what they said in the past versus what they say today, as well as what they say versus what they do. Inconsistency = mixed messages = confusion and waste (or worse). Thanks for listening, Dave!

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